Adapt and Conquer: 1. A Lesson in Failure

Author: Ryan Haughey

Ryan is a writer and musician. He has experience writing for several publications on subjects surrounding campus affairs, music, creative non-fiction, academic writing, and short fiction. Ryan received Mouseland Press awards for 2018 Rookie of the Year and 2019 Best Campus Piece for The Uniter. Ryan studied communications at The University of Winnipeg, and double minored in film and English. Tune into Ryan's radio show on CJUM 101.5 UMFM called "Can We Hang," where they play the best independent Canadian content.

0

October 6, 2020

Adapt and Conquer: 1. A Lesson in Failure

A musing on picking yourself back up again.

To some it may be obvious, but others may not fully understand the age old saying, ‘try, try again’ – missing out on a lesson in failure. We are all our own worst critics, so it can be scary to see yourself fail. But one way to get around that is to envision yourself failing – to embrace a lesson in failure from the experience. That doesn’t really seem like the most positive way of thinking, but it’s important to expect failure. Nothing is perfect on the first try.

Fear of failure is a huge inhibitor for many people. It gets in the way of getting started, and if failure happens, many people might give up or lose confidence. You should embrace failure. Of course I don’t mean that you should expect to fail every time, but understanding that failing is a natural step in the road to success will help you lose that fear of failure, and get you to your destination sooner.

I grew up playing piano from a young age, and being a goofy youngster with high expectations of myself, I often found myself frustrated when I couldn’t play a song right away. If you put sheet music in front of me I would jump in with both hands at full speed without having taken the right steps to learn the song. I’d get frustrated and give up on learning it. Eventually I learned to keep at it and make that piano sing, but I had to learn to keep trying despite sucking at first.

It wasn’t a bad thing that I jumped in with both hands and tried to play it perfectly right away, though. If I hadn’t done that, I wouldn’t have a sense for how the music was supposed to sound when played completely and correctly. It gave me a vision for what I was working toward and even though I failed at first I could go back and keep practicing over and over until I got it right, and even then there was always room to improve.

In a Youtube video from Y Combinator, CEO Michael Seibel says that great founders are those that execute. He says that if a founder says they’re going to do or try something, within two weeks they’ve done it and either succeeded or failed and has learned something from the experience.

This isn’t just true for founders, but for all sorts of creatives and innovators. Whether you’ve succeeded greatly or failed miserably, there is always a lesson to be learned from trying something new. If you’ve failed, or even succeeded while making mistakes along the way, instead of regretting the route you took that ended in failure, take a mindful look at what could be improved upon for the next attempt.

Author: Ryan Haughey

Ryan is a writer and musician. He has experience writing for several publications on subjects surrounding campus affairs, music, creative non-fiction, academic writing, and short fiction. Ryan received Mouseland Press awards for 2018 Rookie of the Year and 2019 Best Campus Piece for The Uniter. Ryan studied communications at The University of Winnipeg, and double minored in film and English. Tune into Ryan's radio show on CJUM 101.5 UMFM called "Can We Hang," where they play the best independent Canadian content.

0

October 6, 2020

You might also be interested in…

Systems Integration is a Philosophical Strategy

Systems Integration is a Philosophical Strategy

Contemporary professionals working at systems integration can benefit from the original wellspring of strategy, Classical Philosophy. But first we need to understand what’s at stake, and how Philosophy can help us do better work and business. Obviously, the very first step is unpacking this word, Philosophy!

read more

0 Comments

Submit a Comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

The Auxesys Update

Sign up to receive regular Auxesys updates.

This site is protected by reCAPTCHA and the Google
Privacy Policy and
Terms of Service apply.

Auxesys is a professional services firm that specializes in business systems integration.

We move beyond technology systems; to help startups, founders, and small and medium businesses (SMBs) integrate their technological, creative, and operational systems and assets.

Auxesys Head Office:
Unit 308
230 Main St.
Winnipeg, MB
R3C 1A8
(204) 900-5838

© 2020 Auxesys Inc.

 

Pin It on Pinterest

Share This